food for thought

by michelle

Archive for the ‘meat’ Category

beef ribs with lemongrass and tamarind

leave a comment »

Wonderfully rich and sticky these beef ribs are sure to impress.

Preheat your oven to 150ºC (300ºF). Brown 3 large or 6 smaller beef ribs briefly, either in a frypan or on a barbecue, and transfer them to a roasting pan with not too much excess space. Now, roughly chop 40g (1.4 oz) each of ginger and galangal, 8 garlic cloves, 6 shallots, 2 lemongrass stalks (white part only) and 2 coriander roots. Using a food processor or mortar and pestle make a fine paste. Spread the paste over ribs, add 4 cups of chicken stock, 130g (4.6 oz) of palm sugar, 1 tablespoon of tamarind concentrate and ⅓ of a cup each of fish sauce and dark soy sauce. Cover with baking parchment then a lid (or foil) and roast for 2½-3 hours until the ribs are very tender. Garnish with coriander and serve with steamed jasmine rice.

*recipe from Gourmet Traveller

Written by michelle picker

April 8, 2020 at 12:07 am

Posted in meat

Tagged with , , ,

pepper steak

with 2 comments

This has been my go-to steak recipe for many years. From the Margaret Fulton Cookbook, it’s cooked in a searing hot dry pan, has plenty of pepper, some tabasco for extra kick and a sauce made from the pan juices and added extras.

Press a generous amount of coarsely cracked black pepper into each side of the steak and allow it to come to room temperature. Have ready these ingredients: Worcestershire sauce, tabasco sauce, half a lemon, some chopped parsley, butter, brandy and cream or sour cream. Sprinkle some salt into a heavy pan and heat the pan until the salt is starting to brown. Now cook the steak for a few minutes on each side. The heat and time of cooking will vary depending on the thickness of the steak and on your preference. I like mine medium-rare. For rarer steak use very high heat, for more cooked steak turn the heat down a little. You can tell how well your steak is cooked by pressing it or you can use an instant-read thermometer to measure the internal temperature: medium-rare 55-60℃ (130-135℉); medium 60-65℃ (140-145℉); medium-well 65-70℃ (150-155℉). Before the steak is finished add 1-2 teaspoons of butter, a dash of Worcestershire sauce, some tabasco sauce to taste, and some lemon juice. Warm 1 tablespoon of brandy, light it and pour it over the steak. Add some cream or sour cream to make a sauce and swirl everything around. Finally, sprinkle the steak with parsley and serve.

I served mine with vegetables grilled on the barbecue – pumpkin, cauliflower and okra – tossed in olive oil and seasoned with salt, pepper and sweet paprika.

Written by michelle picker

January 22, 2020 at 12:23 am

Posted in meat, vegetables

Tagged with , ,

pork rib roast

leave a comment »

If you have a charcoal barbcue, there’s no better way to cook a pork roast. The pork stays moist, crackling is almost guaranteed and you get that added hint of smokiness. Perfect for the festive season.

Take the pork out of the fridge at least one hour before cooking and score the skin. Season the meat and skin generously with salt and set it aside to allow the meat to warm up a little and the salt to penetrate. Now it’s time to start the fire. It will take approximately 45 minutes for the coals to be ready for cooking – they need to stop flaming and become grey and ashy. When they’re ready, make sure the skin of the pork is very dry and salt it once again. Place the roast close to the heat to seal and crisp it. After 20 – 30 minutes move it a little further away from the coals to give it indirect heat. Continue to cook slowly until the meat is still juicy but cooked through. If you have a meat thermometer the internal temperature should be 63ºC (145ºF). Allow the pork to rest before carving. Enjoy!

Written by michelle picker

December 18, 2019 at 12:08 am

Posted in pork & ham & bacon

Tagged with

beef carpaccio

leave a comment »

Here is a fantastic way to serve really good quality beef. For those of you who think they’d rather not eat raw meat, take heart from two of my dinner guests who felt the same but left empty plates.

Eye fillet of beef is ideal for this recipe but it must be absolutely fresh. To make it easier to cut finely, place the meat in the freezer for 2-3 hours until it is semi-frozen. Using a very sharp knife, slice it as finely as possible. When you have all the meat sliced, lay the slices out on some baking paper, cover with another sheet of paper and use a rolling pin to flatten the meat and make the slices even thinner. Now pour some tasty, good quality olive oil into a flat dish or tray and lay the meat into the oil. Top with some more oil and season generously with salt and freshly ground black pepper. To serve, arrange portions of the meat on individual plates, garnish them with a generous amount of lightly toasted pine nuts and good quality shaved parmesan and garnish with some fresh leaves. Serve with wedges of lemon.

*recipe from River Café Easy by Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray

Written by michelle picker

November 13, 2019 at 12:19 am

Posted in meat

Tagged with

lamb meatballs in hot yoghurt sauce

leave a comment »

Fragrant with Middle Eastern spices, swimming in tangy yoghurt sauce and topped with fresh herbs. An absolutely delicious combination.

Normally, these meatballs would contain some breadcrumbs and eggs but this is a low-carb version. From 450g (1 lb) of minced lamb, remove ¼ and blend in a small food processor until fine and sticky. This will be enough to stick the ingredients together. If you don’t have a small food processor you can achieve the same result by massaging the meat with 1 teaspoon of salt until the meat is sticky. Now add the rest of the ingredients: ½ a teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper, ½ a cup of finely diced red onion, 1 teaspoon of toasted ground cumin, 1 teaspoon of toasted ground coriander, ¼ of a teaspoon of ground cinnamon and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Using wet hands, break off walnut-sized pieces of lamb mixture, roll into spheres and set aside on a baking sheet. This recipe will make about 20 small meatballs. Heat your oven to 180ºC (350ºF). In a large frypan heat 2 tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat. Add the meatballs in one layer and brown for 2 minutes a side. Work in batches if necessary to avoid crowding the pan. Transfer to a baking sheet and finish them in the oven while you make the sauce. Pour off any excess oil from the pan and turn the heat to high. Add ¾ of a cup of stock and bring to a simmer. Make a slurry of 1 tablespoon of cornstarch and 2  tablespoons of water. In a bowl whisk ¾ of a cup of Greek-style yogurt with a little salt, an egg and the cornstarch slurry. Pour the yogurt mixture into the hot broth, whisking constantly. Turn the heat down and continue whisking until the yogurt is just heated through and slightly thickened. Do not boil as it will split. Place the meatballs in a serving dish and pour the hot yogurt sauce over them. Sprinkle with some sumac, crushed red pepper and some pinches of turmeric. Top with a generous amount of chopped mint, dill and coriander (cilantro).

*adapted from this recipe

 

Written by michelle picker

October 2, 2019 at 3:45 am

Posted in meat

Tagged with , ,

bún-chả with bbq pork balls

leave a comment »

These Vietnamese pork balls are packed with flavour and wonderful when served as a complete meal with a fresh and delicious rice vermicelli salad and Nuoc Cham. I could eat this any time.

For the pork balls, you will need 450g (1 lb) of pork mince. Place ¼ of the mince in a small food processor and process until sticky. This will help to hold the mixture together. Combine with the rest of mince, 3 teaspoons of Vietnamese fish sauce, 2 -3 teaspoons of caster sugar, ¾ of a teaspoon of salt, plenty of coarsely cracked black pepper, 3 cloves of minced garlic and the finely sliced stems and roots of 4 sprigs of coriander (cilantro). Mix well and divide into small walnut-sized balls. Place them on skewers and barbecue (grill) over high heat for a few minutes on each side until browned and cooked through. Meanwhile soak some rice vermicelli in boiling water until soft enough to eat. Drain and run under cold water to cool. Shred some lettuce, slice cucumber and tomatoes, cut carrots into fine julienne and add lots of herbs – mint, Vietnamese mint, coriander (cilantro) and dill are all suitable. Finally add some roughly chopped peanuts. Serve with Nuoc Cham dipping sauce: combine ¼ of a cup of Vietnamese fish sauce, 3 tablespoons of sugar, 2 minced cloves of garlic, 1 finely diced small red chilli, ¼ of a cup of water and lemon juice to taste. If the balance needs adjusting use fish sauce for saltiness, sugar for sweetness and lemon juice for sourness.

Written by michelle picker

June 19, 2019 at 12:20 am

lamb shanks with anchovies

leave a comment »

This wonderful recipe by Nigel Slater couldn’t be simpler or more delicious. Anchovies are the magical ingredient that make a fantastically tasty rich sauce. Serve it with a soft polenta or potatoes.

Preheat your oven to 160ºC (300ºF) and season 2 lamb shanks with pepper. Heat a little olive oil in a heavy casserole and start browning  the shanks. When they’re slightly browned, add 2 roughly chopped onions and 1 sliced clove of garlic. Chop up 2 anchovy fillets and add them to the casserole. Tear in 2 sprigs of rosemary and 2 bay leaves. Add a cup each of good quality chicken or beef stock and dry red wine and bring to a simmer. Cover and bake in the oven for two hours, turning the shanks halfway through. When the shanks are soft remove them from the sauce, cover them and keep them warm. Meanwhile finish the sauce by adding 2 more chopped anchovies and a handful of chopped parsley. Bring to the boil and adjust the seasoning to taste. Serve the lamb shanks smothered in sauce. 

Written by michelle picker

May 29, 2019 at 12:24 am

Posted in meat

Tagged with ,