food for thought

by michelle

Archive for the ‘red meat’ Category

slow-roasted lamb shoulder

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Iranian in style, this fragrant slow-roasted lamb shoulder is easy to prepare and absolutely delicious. Serve it with rice and a fresh salad.

Preheat your oven to 160ºC (320ºF). Cut 3 onions into wedges and scatter them into a large roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil and season to taste. Place the lamb shoulder on the onions. Coarsely crush 2 teaspoons each of toasted cumin and coriander seeds with a mortar and pestle. Transfer to a bowl and add 4 cloves of crushed garlic, 2 tablespoons of ground sumac, 1 teaspoon of ground cayenne pepper, ½ a teaspoon each of ground cinnamon, cardamom and allspice, the grated rind of 1 orange and 1 lemon, 2 tablespoons of olive oil and ½ a cup each of finely chopped fresh mint and coriander (cilantro). Combine well and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place this mixture on top of the (seasoned) lamb and pat into place to form a crust. Combine the juice of 1 lemon and 1 orange with 300ml (10 fl oz) of chicken stock. Pour this around the lamb shoulder and add 3 dried limes (available from Middle Eastern grocery stores). Cover the lamb shoulder and roast in the oven for 5-6 hours until very tender and falling from the bone.

*from a recipe by Emma Knowles and Alice Storey in Gourmet Traveller

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Written by michelle picker

November 8, 2017 at 12:16 am

home-made pastrami

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As a gift I was given CHARCUTERIE The Craft of Salting Smoking and Curing by Michael Ruhlman and Bryan Polcyn. It’s packed full of excellent recipes. This is how our home-made pastrami turned out.

To make this you will need some beef brisket with most of the fat removed. For a 2¼kg (5 lb) brisket make a brine of 4 litres (1 gallon) of water, 1½ cups of kosher salt, 6 teaspoons of pink curing salt, 1 cup of sugar, ½ a cup of dark brown sugar, ¼ of a cup of honey, 5 minced cloves of garlic and 1 tablespoon of pickling spice. Place the beef in the brine with a plate on top so that it is completely submerged and refrigerate for 3 days. Next, remove the beef, rinse and dry it and discard the brine. In a spice mill or mortar and pestle grind 1 tablespoon of black peppercorns and 1 tablespoon of coriander seeds. Coat the beef evenly with this mixture. Now the beef needs to be hot smoked, or cooked very slowly over a charcoal barbecue with some wood chips for extra smoke. The internal temperature should be 66ºC (150ºF) when it’s cooked. The final step is to steam the pastrami. Heat your oven to 140ºC (275ºF) and place the beef on a rack over a tray with 2.5cm (1″) of water in it. When the water is simmering, cover the pastrami and steam it in the oven for 2-3 hours. Now it’s ready to serve.

Try it in a Pastrami Reuben, a classic American sandwich served hot on toasted rye bread with pastrami, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese and Russian dressing.

Written by michelle picker

September 13, 2017 at 12:40 am

arrachera

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Hanger steak is a cut of beef (from the lower belly of a steer or heifer) prized for its flavour and tenderness. In the past it was sometimes known as butcher’s steak because butchers would keep it for themselves. In Mexico it’s known as Arrachera and is generally marinated, grilled and served with a squeeze of lime juice, accompanied by guacamole, salsa and tortillas.

For 1½ kilos (3 lbs) of hanger steak whisk together 3 tablespoons of finely chopped garlic, 3 tablespoons of corn oil, ½ a cup of tequila, ¼ of a cup fresh lime juice, 1 tablespoon of coarse salt, ½ a tablespoon of ground cumin and ½ a tablespoon ground black pepper. Place the steak in the marinade and leave for 1 hour (or up to 24 in the fridge), turning often. When you’re ready to cook the steak heat a heavy (peferably cast iron) pan or griddle until very hot. Cook the steak for 2-4 minutes a side depending how you like your steak. Serve sliced and garnished with coriander (cilantro).

* this marinade recipe comes from Galley Wench on food.com

Written by michelle picker

August 1, 2017 at 5:44 am

beef short rib stew

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This Korean stew is deliciously sweet and salty. Cook it slowly or (if you’re short on time) in a pressure cooker.

Sear 1.5kg (3 lbs) of beef short ribs in some vegetable oil over high heat then remove to a plate. Lower the heat and add 1 finely diced onion. Cook until soft before adding 4 large finely diced cloves of garlic and an equal amount of finely diced ginger. Cook for a minute more then deglaze the pan with 2 tablespoons of red wine vinegar. When the vinegar has cooked away add ¼ of a cup of apple juice, ¼ of a cup of orange juice, ½ a cup of mirin (sweet cooking sake), ¾ of a cup of soy sauce, 12-15 dried whole shiitake mushrooms and 3 cups of water (or 1½ if you are using a pressure cooker). Simmer for 2 hours (35 minutes in a pressure cooker) then add 2-3 diced carrots and a diced turnip or swede and cook for a further 20-30 minutes (5 minutes in a pressure cooker) until the vegetables are soft. Add 1 drained can of sliced water chestnuts and cook for a few minutes more. Add 2 tablespoons of brown sugar and a small bunch of sliced spring onions and check for seasoning. Thicken with cornflour if desired and serve with steamed rice and kimchi.

Written by michelle picker

May 27, 2017 at 6:02 am

lamb tagine with prunes and raisins

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Adapted by David from an Emeril Lagasse recipe, this tagine has a wonderful balance and depth of flavour.

lamb-tagine-with-prunes

Using lamb on the bone imparts much more flavour to this dish but you can also use diced boneless lamb. Heat some olive oil in a saucepan or tagine and brown approximately 1 kg (2 lbs) of lamb over high heat in batches, removing the browned meat to a plate. Return all the lamb to the pot and add 1½ cups diced onion and cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Add 3 cloves of minced garlic and cook for another minute. Add 1 cup of chicken stock, a pinch of crushed saffron and a bunch of coriander (cilantro) and bring to boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook until the meat is tender. Meanwhile pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 cup of pitted prunes and ½ a cup of golden raisins. Let them soften for 20 minutes then strain them and set aside. When the lamb is nearly tender add the fruit, ½ a thinly sliced onion, 2 tablespoons of honey, 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon, ½ a teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper, and ¾ of a teaspoon of salt. Cook for a further 5-10 minutes. Garnish with coriander and serve with couscous and a fresh salad.

Written by michelle picker

March 24, 2017 at 6:17 am

fine dining in Aukland

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sky-tower-aukland The Sky Tower in Aukland, New Zealand is a distinctive landmark. Thanks to Nicolas who generously gave me a voucher, I ate there with 6 others at The Sugar Club on the 62nd floor. We tried many dishes from chef Peter Gordon’s degustation menu.

turmeric-cured-salmon

 

 

 

First there was an amuse-bouche of turmeric cured salmon over an anchovy paste with crispy lentils.

The menu is designed to go from lighter dishes to heavier so here, in the same order, are some of the outstanding dishes we ordered followed by equally good desserts.

Hiramasa kingfish with nori, cucumber, orange, chilli soy dressing, peanuts and wasabi cream

kingfish

miso eggplant with medjool dates, feta, crispy buckwheat, tahini yoghurt and mango puree

eggplant

asparagus and spiced quails eggs with shiitake, miso and almonds

asparagus-and-spiced-quails-eggs

spiny crayfish and Marlborough saffron linguine with pine nuts and aged parmigiano reggiano

spiny-crayfish

creamed Pāua (the Māori name for abalone or ormer shells) with kiwi dip and frybread

creamed-paua

octopus with corn puree, quinoa, celery and capsicum

octopus

tempura aubergine (eggplant) and blue pea inari with panch phoron spiced tomato pickles, rhubarb and guava

tempura-aubergine

line-caught fish with tempura oyster, mussels, cucumber and dashi

_fish-tempura-oyster-mussels-cucumber-dashi

Hawkes Bay lamb rump with pecorino gnocchi, pesto, lamb floss and preserved lemon dressing

lamb-rump

Mahy Farms beef fillet with spiced beef cheek, smoked mash and spinach

_beef-fillet

Aukland harbour sunset from the Sky Tower

aukland-harbour

berries and meringue

meringue-berry-sorbet

Zealong Oolong panna cotta with matcha sponge, blueberries, fennel confiture and red shiso

panna-cotta

peanut butter parfait with miso caramel, sesame, paprika and orange

peanut-butter-parfait

chocolate cru virunga 70% semifreddo with spiced pineapple, mochi and tamarind caramel

chocolate-semifreddo

Written by michelle picker

February 4, 2017 at 5:57 am

garlic steak + miso pumpkin

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Japanese garlic steak. Need I say more?

japanese-garlic-steak

Make some shallow cuts into each side of the steak and marinate in 45ml (1½ oz) of soy sauce, 1½ tablespoons of mirin (sweet cooking sake) and 2 crushed cloves of garlic for at least 20 minutes. When you’re ready to cook, heat a heavy pan (preferably cast iron) until smoking hot, smear a little oil onto the steaks and cook for 5 minutes or so on each side (for thinner steaks or ones without bones, cook for less time). Serve garnished with green onions.

japanese-garlic-steak-cut

I served my steak with miso grilled butternut. Cut your butternut into wedges, toss in a little oil and salt and bake in a hot oven until softening. Now heat your grill (broiler). Brush the squash with a mixture of 2 tablespoons of sesame oil, 1 tablespoon of mirin, 1 tablespoon of sake, 2 tablespoons of white or yellow miso and 1 tablespoon sugar and grill until caramelising.

japanese-steak-plate 

Written by michelle picker

January 23, 2017 at 5:37 am