food for thought

by michelle

Posts Tagged ‘duck

roast duck

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Roasting a duck is not really as daunting as it seems. This Chinese-style roast duck is best cooked on a charcoal barbecue.

Clean the duck, remove the wing tips and any lumps of fat from inside the cavity and pat it dry with paper towels. Rub salt over the entire duck (about 2 teaspoons) and tie the neck tightly with string. Roughly chop 2-3 spring onions, 1-2 cloves of garlic and an equal amount of fresh ginger.  In a small bowl combine ¼ of a cup of soy sauce, 2 tablespoons of rice wine vinegar, 1 tablespoon of dark soy, 2 teaspoons of five-spice powder and 1 tablespoon of honey  (if you need to liquefy the honey heat it briefly in a microwave). Stir well to combine the ingredients and brush the mixture all over the duck, brushing some into the cavity as well. Place the spring onion, garlic and ginger into the cavity and seal the duck by sewing or securing tightly with skewers. When you’re ready to cook place a disposable aluminium roasting pan under where the duck will cook to avoid flare-ups from the dripping duck fat. Regulate the temperature to approximately 160ºC (325°F). If you’re cooking with charcoal you can add 2 – 3 chunks of smoking wood. Allow the duck to roast for approximately 2½ hours until the skin is golden brown and crispy and the internal temperature of the breast has reached 74ºC (165°F). Serve chopped into pieces with hoisin sauce (diluted with a little water) and chilli oil.  

roast-duck-cut

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Written by michelle picker

April 17, 2019 at 12:28 am

Posted in poultry & game

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ginger braised duck

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Classic Vietnamese flavours, lots of ginger and a little chilli make this braised duck truly tasty.

Use duck legs, thighs or wings for this recipe. Start by browning 6 pieces of duck in some hot oil for a few minutes. Slice a generous amount of ginger into fine slivers and add it to the duck pieces. Continue to fry until the ginger is fragrant. Now add 1½ cups of hot duck or chicken stock, 3 teaspoons of oyster sauce, 2 teaspoons of Thai fish sauce and 1-2 teaspoons of Sriracha chilli sauce. Bring to a simmer and allow to cook uncovered over low heat for 1-1½ hours, checking occasionally to make sure there is still enough liquid. When there is hardly any liquid remaining and the duck is tender and falling from the bone, add some finely shredded carrot, green beans and cabbage. Cook for a further 5 minutes until the vegetables are just cooked. Serve with steamed rice.

Written by michelle picker

February 21, 2018 at 12:37 am

Posted in poultry & game

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red-cooked duck legs

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Red cooking is a Chinese method of slow braising. Popular throughout most of northern, eastern, and southeastern China, the name is derived from the dark red-brown colour of the cooked items and their sauce. Here is a version using duck legs.

red-cooked-duck

First place your duck legs into a cold pan and turn the heat to medium. Allow the fat to render out of the duck and the skin to brown. Meanwhile soak 8-10 whole dried mushrooms in boiling water allowing them to soften. In a pressure cooker or saucepan with a lid, heat a little of the duck fat and fry 2 diced shallots, 3 diced cloves of garlic and a diced knob of ginger. Add 1 whole star anise and 1 teaspoon of Szechuan peppercorns. When the shallots are translucent add the duck legs, 2-3 whole carrots, 4 chopped spring onions, 2 red birds-eye chillies, ½ a cup of chicken stock, a splash of shaoxing wine, ½ a teaspoon of sesame oil, 1-2 tablespoons of soy sauce, 2 tablespoons of Chinese thick caramel sauce and the soaked mushrooms. Cover and cook until the duck is tender and pulling away from the bone. In a pressure cooker 25-30 minutes will be enough otherwise you will need at least 1-1½ hours, making sure from time to time that there is enough liquid in the pot.  Serve with steamed rice and green vegetables.

I served mine with bok choy (pak choi).

bok-choy-with-oyster-sauce

Wash and separate the leaves of the bok choy or if they are very young you can cook them whole. Bring a pot of water to boil and add some salt. Drop the bok choy into the water and cook for a few minutes until tender. Drain well and toss in 1 tablespoon of oyster sauce, a drizzle of sesame oil and ground white pepper to taste.

Written by michelle picker

March 6, 2017 at 5:44 am

Christmas 2011

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I’ve already posted the pudding, but here’s the rest of our Christmas feast.

We started with some garlic prawns (shrimps) cooked in a generous mixture of olive oil and butter and about as much garlic as we could stand. The garlic was slowly cooked in the oil and butter, the prawns added last and seasoned with salt and pepper. Garnished with parsley they were served with a salad of finely sliced fennel dressed with lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.

Next we ate duck, with a cranberry and macadamia stuffing, slowly roasted on a spit and basted with orange juice, lemon juice, five spice and salt. To accompany the duck I made a sour cherry sauce. As well as a fresh green salad we had kipfler potatoes and beetroots roasted in olive oil with garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper; sweet potatoes, carrots and parsnips roasted in olive oil and balsamic vinegar; and mushrooms drizzled with olive oil, basil pesto and feta cheese.

To make the sour cherry sauce cut the duck neck and any spare bits of skin into small pieces and fry until rendered and caramelised then add shallots and cook them until just golden. Add 3 cups of red wine and 1½ cups of chicken stock and reduce this for a while. Strain through a fine sieve and return to the pot adding 1 cup of dried sour cherries, a cinnamon stick and 3 star anise. Reduce until only 2 cups remain and, if desired, thicken with a little cornflour.

Written by michelle picker

December 27, 2011 at 10:00 am

spicy grilled duck breast

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This wonderfully aromatic and spicy grilled duck breast, which I served with a tomato rice and grilled asparagus, is based on a recipe from Bobby Flay’s ‘Boy Meets Grill’ .

The skin on the duck breast is first lightly scored and then rubbed with a dry spice mix made of the following:  1 tablespoon of Spanish paprika, 2 teaspoons of dry mustard, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper, 1 teaspoon of ground star anise, 1 teaspoon of ground ginger, ½ a teaspoon of ground allspice and a pinch of cayenne pepper.

The glaze is made by frying 3 finely diced cloves of garlic and a finely chopped piece of fresh ginger (equivalent size) in some vegetable oil. When softened, add 1 tablespoon of sambal oelek (chilli paste), ¼ of a cup of honey and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce. Continue to cook for one minute.

Heat a heavy pan or griddle and fry the duck breast with the skin side down until it becomes crisp. Now turn the duck over and coat with a generous amount of glaze. Place the pan or griddle under a pre-heated grill and continue to cook for a few more minutes. Allow to rest before serving.

Written by michelle picker

June 24, 2011 at 8:22 pm

Posted in poultry & game

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